Saturday, 30 August 2014

Jeans


Pattern: Drafted based on existing jeans
Fabric: 1.5m dark blue stretch denim, 1.4 m wide; a little white cotton for the inside pockets
Haberdasheries: A metal button, an 8 cm metal zipper, 5 metal studs, normal yarn, topstitching yarn and serger yarn


Since my teens, I have only worn flared trousers, regardless of whether they’re in fashion or not, because I like them and find them the most flattering for my body. But the fact that they have been out of fashion for a while means that I find it very hard to find trousers that I like, and I generally wear them out before I’ve found a replacement. Two years ago I ran into a perfect pair of jeans that was on sale, too, and bought a second pair of the same jeans for when the first had become worn. I’m so glad I did, because that already happened after a little over one and a half years. Meanwhile, skinny jeans are still all I see in the shops (grumble… And most already look worn when you buy them, too! No thanks), so I made a pattern from my newest pair of jeans, and made my own!

It wasn’t always fun, and sometimes I definitely wished I could just buy jeans instead, but it was very interesting to have a closer look at this much-worn garment than I would have done otherwise, and to learn quite a bit about its construction! I always wondered why the outside leg seam on jeans isn’t topstitched, while the inside leg seam is usually an English seam. Well, that is because the inside leg seam is stitched first, and then, once the outside leg has been sewn closed as well, it is no longer possible to topstitch it because there’s too little space for the sewing machine! Except for a small distance at the top, which is English seamed to secure the pocket.

Besides this, I found that it is handy to sew the fabric into a cylinder before washing it for pre-shrinking, because otherwise it can get lighter spots from rubbing into the other laundry items. I always was jeans inside out to prevent this, but you can’t turn a piece of cloth inside out – unless you’ve sewn the sides together.

 

7 comments:

  1. Ziet er onwijs goed en profi uit! Mooier dan de jeans die je in de winkel kunt kopen. Inderdaad, al die 'worn' patches vind ik ook niks. Mooie donkere stof! Al heb ik nu al 3x problemen met donkere broeken dat ze afgeven, misschien de schuld van warm Texas? Is dit Gutermann denim thread dat je gebruikt hebt? De flare staat inderdaad mooi! Ik dacht altijd dat je veel meer hippy flared bedoelde!

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    1. Dank je! Ehm, mijn been is al wel een keer blauw geweest :P. Het is het dikste G├╝termanngaren dat in Nederland te koop is.

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  2. I wish I had a couple of pairs of jeans like the beautiful ones you made. I like my jeans just like that style and they can not be found. I am not happy with the current denim either. I just want the classic denim and the 1972 style. Don't care what anyone else is doing or wearing. These are wonderful.

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    1. Thank you! =) Glad I'm not the only one who feels like that about skinny jeans. Let's hope flared ones get back into fashion soon...

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  3. I forgot to tell you. In the late 1960's the double stitching was on the inseam and the outer leg seam. I am positive because I remember not liking it when they switched to inseam double stitching only.

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    1. Oh, I do wonder how they managed to do that!

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